‘Goat Simulator 3’ comes to ‘Fortnite’ with a “half goat/half human” outfit

“Her arrival in this new world meant giving her a ‘Fortnite’ twist, and muscles”

The post ‘Goat Simulator 3’ comes to ‘Fortnite’ with a “half goat/half human” outfit appeared first on NME.

NME

Coffee Stain Publishing and Epic Games have announced a crossover between Goat Simulator 3 and Fortnite, which will see the former’s four-legged protagonist join the battle royale as an outfit.

From today (September 29) until September 29 2023, anyone who buys any edition of Goat Simulator 3 via the Epic Games Store will be given the ‘A Goat’ outfit in Fortnite.

Anyone who’s already picked up Goat Simulator 3 can redeem ‘A Goat’ by logging into Fortnite, and from November 26 the outfit will also be sold separately through Fortnite‘s Item Shop.

As revealed in the below trailer, ‘A Goat’ is a humanoid version of Goat Simulator 3 protagonist Pilgor, which Elin Hamberg – lead artist at Coffee Stain North – describes as “a questionably named, half goat/half human hybrid.”

“Now we know Goat Simulator 3’s Pilgor looks different in her ‘A Goat’ Fortnite form, but our signature approach to hyperrealism simply didn’t fit in this bright and colourful game,” acknowledged Hamberg. “Her arrival in this new world meant giving her a Fortnite twist, and muscles.”

Ahead of Goat Simulator 3‘s release on November 17, Coffee Stain North recently shared a chaotic gameplay trailer of the sandbox game.

During August’s Gamescom showcase, we previewed Goat Simulator 3 and found a “ludicrously silly sandbox” that’s best played with pals.

Goat Simulator may have debuted to ridicule, but Goat Simulator 3…well, it’s still ridiculous,” reads the preview. “But as a sequel that aims to bring 2014’s zaniest title into the modern day – with eight years-worth of new material to make fun of – that ridiculousness is exactly what you want.”

In other gaming news, Warzone has received its last major patch, ahead of the battle royale’s sequel launching later this year. The final update brings back the game’s “greatest hits,” including fan-favourite game modes and weapons.

The post ‘Goat Simulator 3’ comes to ‘Fortnite’ with a “half goat/half human” outfit appeared first on NME.

‘Goat Simulator 3’ comes to ‘Fortnite’ with a “half goat/half human” outfit

“Her arrival in this new world meant giving her a ‘Fortnite’ twist, and muscles”

The post ‘Goat Simulator 3’ comes to ‘Fortnite’ with a “half goat/half human” outfit appeared first on NME.

NME

Coffee Stain Publishing and Epic Games have announced a crossover between Goat Simulator 3 and Fortnite, which will see the former’s four-legged protagonist join the battle royale as an outfit.

From today (September 29) until September 29 2023, anyone who buys any edition of Goat Simulator 3 via the Epic Games Store will be given the ‘A Goat’ outfit in Fortnite.

Anyone who’s already picked up Goat Simulator 3 can redeem ‘A Goat’ by logging into Fortnite, and from November 26 the outfit will also be sold separately through Fortnite‘s Item Shop.

As revealed in the below trailer, ‘A Goat’ is a humanoid version of Goat Simulator 3 protagonist Pilgor, which Elin Hamberg – lead artist at Coffee Stain North – describes as “a questionably named, half goat/half human hybrid.”

“Now we know Goat Simulator 3’s Pilgor looks different in her ‘A Goat’ Fortnite form, but our signature approach to hyperrealism simply didn’t fit in this bright and colourful game,” acknowledged Hamberg. “Her arrival in this new world meant giving her a Fortnite twist, and muscles.”

Ahead of Goat Simulator 3‘s release on November 17, Coffee Stain North recently shared a chaotic gameplay trailer of the sandbox game.

During August’s Gamescom showcase, we previewed Goat Simulator 3 and found a “ludicrously silly sandbox” that’s best played with pals.

Goat Simulator may have debuted to ridicule, but Goat Simulator 3…well, it’s still ridiculous,” reads the preview. “But as a sequel that aims to bring 2014’s zaniest title into the modern day – with eight years-worth of new material to make fun of – that ridiculousness is exactly what you want.”

In other gaming news, Warzone has received its last major patch, ahead of the battle royale’s sequel launching later this year. The final update brings back the game’s “greatest hits,” including fan-favourite game modes and weapons.

The post ‘Goat Simulator 3’ comes to ‘Fortnite’ with a “half goat/half human” outfit appeared first on NME.

‘Homicidal All-Stars’ preview: turn-based carnage

The gunning man

The post ‘Homicidal All-Stars’ preview: turn-based carnage appeared first on NME.

NME

Homicidal All-Stars is the game show of the future, and as with all of these things, that involves ultraviolence and a kill or be killed mentality. I mean, seriously, can’t they just reboot Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, or something? Always with the violence.

Homicidal All-Stars takes its inspirations from the crossroads of The Running Man, Smash TV and XCOM, offering up intense tactical combat and third-person exploration sections as you make your way through a tightly scripted narrative campaign. We had open access to play for a few hours through a preview build that showed up a lot of different options in terms of skill trees

Players will control Scarlett Martillo – if she dies it’s over – and a bunch of other competitors in the titular TV show that will help you bring the pain. When you’re adventuring, you’ll control only Scarlett as you charge around the place trying to dodge traps, find loot and… build your brand by signing autographs and cultivating a personality through your interactions. These interactions are definitely a unique vibe, and through these early opening chats are mostly fans asking who you are or mistaking you for other competitors, they were full of character.

Homicidal All-Stars. Credit: Artificer.

The setting feels like the sticky floor of a nightclub you should have left an hour ago, while the braying crowds, harsh neons and the traps – oh the traps – you’re navigating during the third-person action segments all just give off a strong dystopian vision that you can practically smell through your monitor. It’s compelling stuff that mostly serves to steer you between the turn-based encounters with the minimum of fuss, but I found I quite enjoyed it once I got past how odd it was to switch between turn-based and third-person control schemes.

There’s something similarly grimy about the combat. It’s relentless and rather than the clinical finish you’ll see in something like XCOM, here trading damage with enemies feels nearly essential: there are even bonuses handed out for taking more than your full health bar of damage without dying. Killing enemies often sees them blown to chunks, covering the maps in a meaty paste. However, if you’re not careful that could become your fate too, as enemies have a range of weapons and tactics that can easily take advantage of your mistakes. Do you want to get gutted with a katana? Me neither, but if you get the positioning wrong it’s going to happen.

Homicidal All-Stars. Credit: Artificer.

Developer Artificer has a lot of experience in the space, with the team working previously on Hard West and Phantom Doctrine, and it’s clear for playing for a little bit that they’re experts at making turn-based tactics games, but Homicidal All-Stars is better for being stripped back, focused only on what’s in front of you at any given moment, and it’s quite freeing for there to be no real strategy layer. You brawl, you get XP, you level up. There’s nothing else to stress about.

Couple that up with combat that has you blowing the hell out of bunny-faced criminals and ducking between semi-demolished shops, screens bearing branded advertisements and the sheer fun of turning your enemies into a meaty paste, and Homicidal All-Stars could be a perfect game for when you’re not feeling like thinking too hard but still want to enjoy some intense tactical action.

Homicidal All-Stars is coming soon to PC

The post ‘Homicidal All-Stars’ preview: turn-based carnage appeared first on NME.

‘Homicidal All-Stars’ preview: turn-based carnage

The gunning man

The post ‘Homicidal All-Stars’ preview: turn-based carnage appeared first on NME.

NME

Homicidal All-Stars is the game show of the future, and as with all of these things, that involves ultraviolence and a kill or be killed mentality. I mean, seriously, can’t they just reboot Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, or something? Always with the violence.

Homicidal All-Stars takes its inspirations from the crossroads of The Running Man, Smash TV and XCOM, offering up intense tactical combat and third-person exploration sections as you make your way through a tightly scripted narrative campaign. We had open access to play for a few hours through a preview build that showed up a lot of different options in terms of skill trees

Players will control Scarlett Martillo – if she dies it’s over – and a bunch of other competitors in the titular TV show that will help you bring the pain. When you’re adventuring, you’ll control only Scarlett as you charge around the place trying to dodge traps, find loot and… build your brand by signing autographs and cultivating a personality through your interactions. These interactions are definitely a unique vibe, and through these early opening chats are mostly fans asking who you are or mistaking you for other competitors, they were full of character.

Homicidal All-Stars. Credit: Artificer.

The setting feels like the sticky floor of a nightclub you should have left an hour ago, while the braying crowds, harsh neons and the traps – oh the traps – you’re navigating during the third-person action segments all just give off a strong dystopian vision that you can practically smell through your monitor. It’s compelling stuff that mostly serves to steer you between the turn-based encounters with the minimum of fuss, but I found I quite enjoyed it once I got past how odd it was to switch between turn-based and third-person control schemes.

There’s something similarly grimy about the combat. It’s relentless and rather than the clinical finish you’ll see in something like XCOM, here trading damage with enemies feels nearly essential: there are even bonuses handed out for taking more than your full health bar of damage without dying. Killing enemies often sees them blown to chunks, covering the maps in a meaty paste. However, if you’re not careful that could become your fate too, as enemies have a range of weapons and tactics that can easily take advantage of your mistakes. Do you want to get gutted with a katana? Me neither, but if you get the positioning wrong it’s going to happen.

Homicidal All-Stars. Credit: Artificer.

Developer Artificer has a lot of experience in the space, with the team working previously on Hard West and Phantom Doctrine, and it’s clear for playing for a little bit that they’re experts at making turn-based tactics games, but Homicidal All-Stars is better for being stripped back, focused only on what’s in front of you at any given moment, and it’s quite freeing for there to be no real strategy layer. You brawl, you get XP, you level up. There’s nothing else to stress about.

Couple that up with combat that has you blowing the hell out of bunny-faced criminals and ducking between semi-demolished shops, screens bearing branded advertisements and the sheer fun of turning your enemies into a meaty paste, and Homicidal All-Stars could be a perfect game for when you’re not feeling like thinking too hard but still want to enjoy some intense tactical action.

Homicidal All-Stars is coming soon to PC

The post ‘Homicidal All-Stars’ preview: turn-based carnage appeared first on NME.

Veteran composer Inon Zur talks 20 years of Bethesda: “‘Starfield’ is my best score to date”

Chatting to NME, Zur reflects on scoring ‘Fallout’ and what’s next with ‘Starfield’

The post Veteran composer Inon Zur talks 20 years of Bethesda: “‘Starfield’ is my best score to date” appeared first on NME.

NME

For over two decades, composer Inon Zur has brought our favourite games to life. Since stepping into the world of video game scores in 2000, Zur has been the sound behind many of our beloved noughties gems – including Baldur’s Gate 2, Prince Of Persia, and Crysis to name a few.

But for many gamers, Zur’s long-running collaboration with Bethesda will stand out the most. Zur has scored every single one of the company’s post-apocalyptic Fallout games – from 2001’s Fallout Tactics to every single one of the series’ later 3D entries, including that special trip to New Vegas.

For those of us who have braved Bethesda’s rad-soaked hellscapes without our Pip-Boy radio stations blaring, Zur’s scores are likely to be one of the most memorable parts of our journey. Like the wastelands he scores, you never know exactly what you’ll get from Zur’s work on Fallout – from the fear of running into your first Super Mutant Behemoth to fighting to determine the fate of the Mojave, Zur never fails to capture the emotion behind every moment.

Fallout: New Vegas. Credit: Obsidian Entertainment.

Though one of Fallout’s most iconic features is the vintage radios filled with real-world bops from the ’40s and ’50s, Zur tells NME that he is “pretty adamant on writing music that has nothing to do with the radio stations,” and at times will even create a score that plays “in contrast” to the radio’s music.

“But every now and then I will sneak in an element, maybe a guitar riff or a few chords, from one of the songs into the score,” admits Zur. “I challenge players to listen to the radio stations and find where I planted these secret gems – where I’m hinting at one of the songs – in the scores. The first one who finds these gets a personal tour of my studio!”

While Fallout‘s radio stations are filled with poppy cheer and lovesick ballads, Zur’s scores are anything but. Take the main theme to Fallout 4 – while it begins with a fragile beauty, it avalanches into a determined, brassy crescendo. It plays to the gravitas of Bethesda’s devastated worlds, but doesn’t linger on the universe’s darker side – it’s a rousing call to action, one that inspires adventure and a dash of hope. Just like Zur’s decision to stay away from leaning into Fallout‘s vintage side, the decision to hone in on our emotions, rather than entirely on what’s going on in the game, is a conscious choice.

Fallout 4 Credit: Bethesda

“The worlds that Bethesda are creating are multi-dimensional, they are very, very deep and you can find many emotional aspects in their world-building. One of the things that Bethesda is really good at is building a multi-layered experience. They can capture a dark landscape with scary events but still evoke hope in your heart, or create the urge for exploration and excitement for embarking on a new adventure.”

That’s an angle that Zur – and Bethesda – will continue to explore in Starfield, the studio’s upcoming open-world RPG set across the universe. It’s shaping up to be Bethesda’s biggest title yet, and Zur says it will carry many of Fallout’s themes with it.

“Much like Fallout, Starfield has even more of these themes and experiences. On the one hand, what motivates us to leave and explore the universe and the dangers of discovering other unknown worlds but also the excitement of a new voyage and hope for the future is exhilarating.”

Though Starfield won’t grace our consoles until next year, eager fans have already had their first taste of its soundtrack with ‘Starfield Suite‘, an exhilarating piece that captures everything that makes space so captivating to us. We were treated to ‘Starfield Suite’ while Bethesda was yet to share any gameplay of Starfield, and likewise, its opening movements was Zur’s first experience with the game. Nearly a year later, the magic of ‘Starfield Suite’ is still alive – and you can listen to a solo rendition from Zur below.

“I composed those cues before I even knew the full vision for Starfield, so they were inspired by just the notion of the exploration, mystery and wonder of space,” Zur points out.

“After I visited Bethesda Game Studios in early 2016 I wrote these two pieces based purely on this premise and using my imagination, I did not see any concept art or know the story yet. It was essentially music that was shared with the artists for inspiration, and so they found themselves creating the game’s art and design aesthetic along to this music.”

“Most of the time I take into consideration the story, the art design, the motivation of the characters and so on, but in this case, it was a unique chain of events whereby I wrote music that was just inspired by the idea behind Starfield,” Zur continued. “The suite is based on the main theme, which itself was an interesting journey as it was not initially the main theme. Originally, I wrote another main theme which evolved over several iterations but the version we ultimately went with took another direction that became the now recognized theme with the six-note motif.”

Starfield. Credit: Bethesda.

Decades before Starfield was announced, sci-fi blockbusters and sweeping scores have gone hand-in-hand – with John Williams’ iconic Star Wars theme coming first to mind. However, Zur wants Starfield‘s score to stand with its own character.

“When people think about orchestral music for sci-fi, they tend to automatically think of Star Wars because it’s so prominent in our pop culture,” acknowledges Zur. “Subsequently, anything else that is written for sci-fi and is orchestral in style finds itself in this realm to some extent. My music was not born out of nothing as I am inspired by great composers like John Williams, Jerry Goldsmith and others, and I’m sure some of these influences are subconsciously present in some of the music I wrote.”

“But I think once you hear the full array of music for Starfield, you will appreciate that there are many components to the score that are very, very different and hand crafted for Starfield,” he adds, saying he “really can’t wait” to reveal more of Starfield‘s music.

As Zur prepares for next year’s release of Starfield, he reflects on his two-decade collaboration with Bethesda. Zur says working with Bethesda is “very different to working with many other studios,” and praises the creativity he’s been allowed to explore with Starfield.

Starfield. Credit: Bethesda.

“With Bethesda, they very much give me the freedom to be inspired and follow my own instincts, rather than asking me to follow this or that direction. We’ve been working together for many years now and both [Starfield audio director] Mark Lampert and [game director] Todd Howard always ask me to do what I think creatively, and if they do hear something that steps outside of what they envision then they will be sure to tell me. They trust my artistic judgment and ability, and always welcome my point of view.”

“It’s a wonderful collaboration,” adds Zur, who says that his history with Bethesda has “definitely” affected how he’s approached scoring Starfield.”After 20 years of working with Bethesda over multiple projects we’ve both grown to know each other very well,” explains the composer.

“We know what to expect from each other but we are also eager to surprise each other! We are really motivated to develop our collaborative partnership and to push the creative boundaries higher and higher. We take every chord that we work on together as a stepping stone, a benchmark that we can stand on to make our next advancement. Sometimes we’re referencing interesting elements from previous projects – Fallout, The Elder Scrolls: Blades – as a starting point to develop new ideas. The way we approach artistic attributions is very similar. Usually it’s more philosophical, how we try to encapsulate the emotion in the musical piece rather than describing what the player is doing on screen.”

With a formidable body of work behind him, Zur is looking forward to what’s next. Beyond Bethesda, the composer would love to take a shot at scoring James Bond, and is keen to revisit Prince Of Persia – which he says would be “very exciting to me as a composer.”

But right now, it’s all eyes on Starfield – and Zur couldn’t be prouder of his latest score. “I feel that Starfield is my best score to date, although that does not take away from any other scores which I have composed for Bethesda,” says Zur. “I think that each of the scores for the Fallout series and others have their moments and uniqueness. But as a whole piece of work, I believe Starfield shows more of my maturity as a composer.”

Starfield launches in 2023 for PC and Xbox Series X|S

The post Veteran composer Inon Zur talks 20 years of Bethesda: “‘Starfield’ is my best score to date” appeared first on NME.

Veteran composer Inon Zur talks 20 years of Bethesda: “‘Starfield’ is my best score to date”

Chatting to NME, Zur reflects on scoring ‘Fallout’ and what’s next with ‘Starfield’

The post Veteran composer Inon Zur talks 20 years of Bethesda: “‘Starfield’ is my best score to date” appeared first on NME.

NME

For over two decades, composer Inon Zur has brought our favourite games to life. Since stepping into the world of video game scores in 2000, Zur has been the sound behind many of our beloved noughties gems – including Baldur’s Gate 2, Prince Of Persia, and Crysis to name a few.

But for many gamers, Zur’s long-running collaboration with Bethesda will stand out the most. Zur has scored every single one of the company’s post-apocalyptic Fallout games – from 2001’s Fallout Tactics to every single one of the series’ later 3D entries, including that special trip to New Vegas.

For those of us who have braved Bethesda’s rad-soaked hellscapes without our Pip-Boy radio stations blaring, Zur’s scores are likely to be one of the most memorable parts of our journey. Like the wastelands he scores, you never know exactly what you’ll get from Zur’s work on Fallout – from the fear of running into your first Super Mutant Behemoth to fighting to determine the fate of the Mojave, Zur never fails to capture the emotion behind every moment.

Fallout: New Vegas. Credit: Obsidian Entertainment.

Though one of Fallout’s most iconic features is the vintage radios filled with real-world bops from the ’40s and ’50s, Zur tells NME that he is “pretty adamant on writing music that has nothing to do with the radio stations,” and at times will even create a score that plays “in contrast” to the radio’s music.

“But every now and then I will sneak in an element, maybe a guitar riff or a few chords, from one of the songs into the score,” admits Zur. “I challenge players to listen to the radio stations and find where I planted these secret gems – where I’m hinting at one of the songs – in the scores. The first one who finds these gets a personal tour of my studio!”

While Fallout‘s radio stations are filled with poppy cheer and lovesick ballads, Zur’s scores are anything but. Take the main theme to Fallout 4 – while it begins with a fragile beauty, it avalanches into a determined, brassy crescendo. It plays to the gravitas of Bethesda’s devastated worlds, but doesn’t linger on the universe’s darker side – it’s a rousing call to action, one that inspires adventure and a dash of hope. Just like Zur’s decision to stay away from leaning into Fallout‘s vintage side, the decision to hone in on our emotions, rather than entirely on what’s going on in the game, is a conscious choice.

Fallout 4 Credit: Bethesda

“The worlds that Bethesda are creating are multi-dimensional, they are very, very deep and you can find many emotional aspects in their world-building. One of the things that Bethesda is really good at is building a multi-layered experience. They can capture a dark landscape with scary events but still evoke hope in your heart, or create the urge for exploration and excitement for embarking on a new adventure.”

That’s an angle that Zur – and Bethesda – will continue to explore in Starfield, the studio’s upcoming open-world RPG set across the universe. It’s shaping up to be Bethesda’s biggest title yet, and Zur says it will carry many of Fallout’s themes with it.

“Much like Fallout, Starfield has even more of these themes and experiences. On the one hand, what motivates us to leave and explore the universe and the dangers of discovering other unknown worlds but also the excitement of a new voyage and hope for the future is exhilarating.”

Though Starfield won’t grace our consoles until next year, eager fans have already had their first taste of its soundtrack with ‘Starfield Suite‘, an exhilarating piece that captures everything that makes space so captivating to us. We were treated to ‘Starfield Suite’ while Bethesda was yet to share any gameplay of Starfield, and likewise, its opening movements was Zur’s first experience with the game. Nearly a year later, the magic of ‘Starfield Suite’ is still alive – and you can listen to a solo rendition from Zur below.

“I composed those cues before I even knew the full vision for Starfield, so they were inspired by just the notion of the exploration, mystery and wonder of space,” Zur points out.

“After I visited Bethesda Game Studios in early 2016 I wrote these two pieces based purely on this premise and using my imagination, I did not see any concept art or know the story yet. It was essentially music that was shared with the artists for inspiration, and so they found themselves creating the game’s art and design aesthetic along to this music.”

“Most of the time I take into consideration the story, the art design, the motivation of the characters and so on, but in this case, it was a unique chain of events whereby I wrote music that was just inspired by the idea behind Starfield,” Zur continued. “The suite is based on the main theme, which itself was an interesting journey as it was not initially the main theme. Originally, I wrote another main theme which evolved over several iterations but the version we ultimately went with took another direction that became the now recognized theme with the six-note motif.”

Starfield. Credit: Bethesda.

Decades before Starfield was announced, sci-fi blockbusters and sweeping scores have gone hand-in-hand – with John Williams’ iconic Star Wars theme coming first to mind. However, Zur wants Starfield‘s score to stand with its own character.

“When people think about orchestral music for sci-fi, they tend to automatically think of Star Wars because it’s so prominent in our pop culture,” acknowledges Zur. “Subsequently, anything else that is written for sci-fi and is orchestral in style finds itself in this realm to some extent. My music was not born out of nothing as I am inspired by great composers like John Williams, Jerry Goldsmith and others, and I’m sure some of these influences are subconsciously present in some of the music I wrote.”

“But I think once you hear the full array of music for Starfield, you will appreciate that there are many components to the score that are very, very different and hand crafted for Starfield,” he adds, saying he “really can’t wait” to reveal more of Starfield‘s music.

As Zur prepares for next year’s release of Starfield, he reflects on his two-decade collaboration with Bethesda. Zur says working with Bethesda is “very different to working with many other studios,” and praises the creativity he’s been allowed to explore with Starfield.

Starfield. Credit: Bethesda.

“With Bethesda, they very much give me the freedom to be inspired and follow my own instincts, rather than asking me to follow this or that direction. We’ve been working together for many years now and both [Starfield audio director] Mark Lampert and [game director] Todd Howard always ask me to do what I think creatively, and if they do hear something that steps outside of what they envision then they will be sure to tell me. They trust my artistic judgment and ability, and always welcome my point of view.”

“It’s a wonderful collaboration,” adds Zur, who says that his history with Bethesda has “definitely” affected how he’s approached scoring Starfield.”After 20 years of working with Bethesda over multiple projects we’ve both grown to know each other very well,” explains the composer.

“We know what to expect from each other but we are also eager to surprise each other! We are really motivated to develop our collaborative partnership and to push the creative boundaries higher and higher. We take every chord that we work on together as a stepping stone, a benchmark that we can stand on to make our next advancement. Sometimes we’re referencing interesting elements from previous projects – Fallout, The Elder Scrolls: Blades – as a starting point to develop new ideas. The way we approach artistic attributions is very similar. Usually it’s more philosophical, how we try to encapsulate the emotion in the musical piece rather than describing what the player is doing on screen.”

With a formidable body of work behind him, Zur is looking forward to what’s next. Beyond Bethesda, the composer would love to take a shot at scoring James Bond, and is keen to revisit Prince Of Persia – which he says would be “very exciting to me as a composer.”

But right now, it’s all eyes on Starfield – and Zur couldn’t be prouder of his latest score. “I feel that Starfield is my best score to date, although that does not take away from any other scores which I have composed for Bethesda,” says Zur. “I think that each of the scores for the Fallout series and others have their moments and uniqueness. But as a whole piece of work, I believe Starfield shows more of my maturity as a composer.”

Starfield launches in 2023 for PC and Xbox Series X|S

The post Veteran composer Inon Zur talks 20 years of Bethesda: “‘Starfield’ is my best score to date” appeared first on NME.

CANDLEMASS Shares ‘Sweet Evil Sun’ Title Track

Swedish doom metal legends CANDLEMASS will release a new studio album, “Sweet Evil Sun”, on November 18 via Napalm Records. The official music video for the LP’s second single, the “Sweet Evil Sun” title track, can be seen below.
“Sweet Evil Sun” kicks…

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Swedish doom metal legends CANDLEMASS will release a new studio album, "Sweet Evil Sun", on November 18 via Napalm Records. The official music video for the LP's second single, the "Sweet Evil Sun" title track, can be seen below. "Sweet Evil Sun" kicks in with warning guitar feedback before sludging...

Muse Announce 2023 North American “Will of the People Tour”

With special guests Evanescence.

Muse Announce 2023 North American “Will of the People Tour”
Wren Graves

Consequence

Fresh off the release of their new album, Will of the People, Muse have announced the 2023 “Will of the People Tour.” Evanescence will accompany the band as a special guest. The 20-date North American trek will kick off in February in Chicago, Illinois, and Muse will definitely be racking up the frequent…

Please click the link below to read the full article.

Muse Announce 2023 North American “Will of the People Tour”
Wren Graves

Flaming Lips Announce Massive ‘Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots’ 20th Anniversary Reissue

Box set features 100 tracks, 50 of which were unreleased, including b-sides, demos, live recordings, EPs and more

Music – Rolling Stone

Box set features 100 tracks, 50 of which were unreleased, including b-sides, demos, live recordings, EPs and more
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